Saturday, November 22, 2008



At first, your blood sugar level may rise so slowly that you may not know that anything is wrong. One-third of all people who have diabetes do not know that they have the disease.1

If you do have symptoms of type 2 diabetes, they may include:

  • Feeling thirsty.
  • Having to urinate more than usual.
  • Feeling more hungry than usual.
  • Losing weight without trying to.
  • Feeling very tired.
  • Feeling cranky.

Other signs of type 2 diabetes may include:

  • Infections and cuts and bruises that heal slowly.
  • Blurred vision.
  • Tingling or numbness in your hands or feet.
  • Trouble with skin, gum, or bladder infections.
  • Vaginal yeast infections.

Some people have already developed more serious health problems by the time they are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Over time, diabetes can lead to problems with the eyes, kidneys, heart, blood vessels, and nerves. Signs of these problems may include:

  • Numbness, tingling, burning pain, or swelling in your feet or hands (diabetic neuropathy).
  • Blurred or distorted vision or seeing flashes of light; seeing large, floating red or black spots; or seeing large areas that look like floating hair, cotton fibers, or spiderwebs (diabetic retinopathy).
  • Chest pain or shortness of breath. This may be a sign of heart or blood vessel problems.